DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Master in Philosophy - Year Two

Master in Philosophy - Year Two

Credits: 60

Master 2 in Philosophy

Term : 1 year (can be spread over 2 calendar years)

Degree : Domuni Universitas

Requirement: MA1 in Philosophy (or equivalent)

Courses list

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato ranks as one of the most important thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition. This module introduces the student to some of the fundamental ideas that inform his works as well as guiding the student through some developments in his presentation of these ideas.

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

This course introduces some of the key elements in Aristotle's thought. It will consider, among other things, Aristotle on language, logic, “first philosophy” or “wisdom”, and effective choice and action. In the appendices, Aristotle on language and logic in the Organon, on nature in the Physics, on “first philosophy” or “wisdom” in the Metaphysics, and on effective choice and action in the Nichomachean Ethics will be considered.

Foundations of Ethics

Foundations of Ethics

Ethics, like philosophy, is in search of principles and universals. Ethics reflects on a particular human experience, namely, the experience of the good or of being good, and sets it in the context of the whole. One could also say that ethics reflects on what is the good and how our lives are oriented towards it

Bioethics 1 : Foundations of Modern Bioethics

Bioethics 1 : Foundations of Modern Bioethics

Legal basis: enforcement of duty on investigators

Philosophical basis: emphasizes principles on which actions are based/justified

Moral basis: Determining which actions are good and allowed or bad and proscribed (in the context of research).

Bioethics II : Informed Consent and Risk Analysis

Bioethics II : Informed Consent and Risk Analysis

Investigators have a duty to ensure subjects give not only informed, but voluntary consent?

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Concerned with restoring and strengthening bonds between professionals, patients and families, not simply dealing with principles like bioethics.
Uses cases and relies on the clinician-patient relationships/encounters in contributing to research on ethical issues

Social political philosophy

Social political philosophy

Social Political Philosophy tries to establish norms, rules and ideal standards, how the social and political life should be. Different from Political science, which is the art of governing people. Political science is the Discipline and the practice of assuring the “common good” of a certain society. Different from Social Sciences, which are descriptive disciplines, they try to know the social facts and to find connections (cause/effect) among them as sociology does.

Philosophy of Religion 1rst part

Philosophy of Religion 1rst part

Philosophy of religion is also known as philosophical theology or philosophy of God. Other names include natural theology and theodicy.

The validation of the course is done at the end of the second part

Philosophy of Religion 2nd part

Philosophy of Religion 2nd part

Philosophy of religion is also known as philosophical theology or philosophy of God. Other names include natural theology and theodicy.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

The modern epistemological problem has two aspects:

1. The opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error. We find this basically in Descartes and Kant.

2. The conflict between science and science or that of contemporary and classic physics and not an opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error.

The Origins of Philosophy (Presocratics)

The Origins of Philosophy (Presocratics)

This course is divided into six sections. The first section – What is Philosophy? – deals with the problems surrounding any definition of the discipline and looks at various ways of thinking about it. The second section – Why Study Philosophy? – distinguishes some general types of reasons, and then examines reasons for studying philosophy. Section three looks at the relationship of philosophy to theology. It distinguishes different ways in which they might relate, and gives a historical survey of that relationship. Section four – Main Areas of Philosophy – introduces the main branches of the subject and gives a preliminary account of them. Section five, Presocratic Philosophy, looks at the earliest Greek philosophers and at how philosophy developed from myth. It examines two key issues: the problem of ‘appearance and reality’ and the problem of ‘the one and the many’. The final section introduces the student to Socrates. It presents the life and death of this iconic figure and examines the political intrigue surrounding his death and his own account of his philosophical vocation.

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

According to Gibelin in his Foreword to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Freedom is the central theme of Kant’s philosophy. This course will introduce to Kant, centering on Freedom as a key concept to understand his philosophy, in the three spheres defined by the critical project: Metaphysics, Moral and Aesthetics.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

The term ‘anthropology’ is derived from two Greek words: ἀνθωπος (anthrōpos) and λογος (logos). The former (anthrōpos) refers to ‘man’ in the generic sense, that is to say, it means ‘human being’; the latter (logos) signifies ‘discourse’ or ‘science. Philosophical anthropology is thus concerned with a philosophical account of the mystery of the human being. Naturally, the history of philosophy has produced a wealth of approaches and an abundance of profound insights concerning the human being. It has also given rise to numerous errors in this regard.
This course will engage the question of how we are to construe the relationship that obtains between body and soul/mind. Rather than adopting a purely historical approach, beginning with Aristotle,
the text begins with an exposition of three different contemporary treatments of this issue before proceeding to expound important aspects of Aristotle’s and St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysics of human nature.

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics I

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics I

To show the implications of normative theories for specific moral issues or contemporary debates on particular ethical issues.

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics II

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics II

To show the implications of normative theories for specific moral issues or contemporary debates on particular ethical issues.

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

The norm is the idea central to the thought of Michel Foucault. It is the point from which he studies modern society. He distinguishes the norm from other forms of power.

Being and Knowing

Being and Knowing

Essential Questions of Philosophy in this very complete course about Being and Knowing.

Indian Philosophy Unit I

Indian Philosophy Unit I

The main objective of this unit is to get an above all understanding of what Indian Philosophy is and in what circumstances it has developed. Though Indian Philosophy has developed in different parts of India it has many common characteristics hence the student is likely to know a few important ones. Furthermore, one should have a basic understanding of what Indian philosophy is accused of.

Indian Philosophy Unit II

Indian Philosophy Unit II

What is expected from the students in this Unit is that they must be able to point out the importance of Vedas in Indian Philosophy, the classification of Vedic literature and must have a proper understanding of the Samhitās, Brāhmaṇas and Āraṇyakas. However, the Upaniśads will be dealt separately. Further, one must be acquainted with a few other important teachings of Veda such as Vedic religion, how monism developed from polytheism, and a basic understanding of what ṛta, the law of karma, the theory of creation, the institution of yajñaāśramas and varṇa is.

Indian Philosophy Unit III

Indian Philosophy Unit III

By Studying this particular unit one must be able to understand what is the meaning of Upaniṣad, how it was developed from Vedas and what are its main teachings and how they reach their logical culmination in the identity of the self and the Brahman. One must also be able to understand the Upaniṣadic view point of bondage and liberation along with the cosmogony and puruṣārtas.

The main objective of the conclusion is to introduce the students to the different systems of Indian Philosophy as it deals with various philosophical thoughts of several traditions originated in Indian Subcontinent.

Philosophy of Language

Philosophy of Language

This course seeks to introduce students to some attempts at outlining the definition and purpose of philosophy of language. From there students will be taken through some traditional problems of philosophy of language such as theories of meaning, reference and denoting, and how these have been debated. The importance of language as a communicative tool that conveys meaning and intentions as well as our own understanding of the world is obvious. This course will seek to take students through this importance from a philosophical perspective.

Analytic Philosophy

Analytic Philosophy

This course seeks to introduce students to analytic philosophy. Students will be taken through some attempts at defining what analytic philosophy is, in particular how analytic philosophy understands philosophical problems and its own suggestions at approaching those problems. Then students will be led through an example of a debate in analytic philosophy. We will look at Strawson’s paper on referring and Russell’s response to it. The rest of the course will look at various topics considered proper to analytic philosophy.

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

This course will take students through ethical discourse from the time of Plato to Aristotle, then to Kant and utilitarians. The principal aim of this course is to make students aware of the different traditions or approaches to ethics. Students can then be able to compare some of the most influential ethical theorists in human history.