DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

The norm is the idea central to the thought of Michel Foucault. It is the point from which he studies modern society. He distinguishes the norm from other forms of power.

ECTS Credits: 6
Professor: Emmanuel Boissieu

Stage 1. The Normal and the Pathological

1. Disease : a natural order

1. 1 A common order
1. 2 The patient exterior to his disease
1. 3 A denaturing/deformation of disease

2. Epidemics

2. 1 Distinction between class / epidemic
2. 2 Medicine : the creator of norms
2. 3 From health to normality

3. The clinical

3. 1 Under the medical gaze
3. 2 Signs and symptoms
3. 3 Abnormality as regularity
3. 4 The gaze as language
3. 5 An aesthetic normality
3. 6 The glance

4. The anatomo-clinical

4. 1 A new definition of disease Erreur ! Le signet n’est pas défini.
4. 2 Disease as a composite of life and death Erreur ! Le signet n’est pas défini.
4. 3 Death and abnormality Erreur ! Le signet n’est pas défini.

Conclusion

Stage 2. The abnormal

1. The union of the three figures

1.1 The abnormal as perverse
1.2 The three figures
1. 3 The conjunction of the three figures

2. An origin: the monster

2.1 A distant origin
2.2 The monster in antiquity
2.3 The monster in the Middle Ages
2.4 The monster in the Classical Age
2.5 Juridico-political monstrosity
2.6 The monstrous criminal
2.7 The king as monster
2.8 The people as monster
2.9 The move from monstrous to abnormal

3. The undisciplined

3.1 The incorrigible
3.2 Incarceration

4. The child mastubator

4.1 Anomaly and sexuality
4.2The family as locus of normalisation
4.3 Instinct and sexuality
4.4 An excess of instinct

5. The madman as abnormal

5.1 The birth of psychiatrisation
5.2 The degenerate
5.3 The omnipotence of medical power

Conclusion

Stage 3 The madman as abnormal

1. Madness as insanity/unreason

1.1 Abnormality as disorder
1.2 Between individual responsibility and social abnormality
1.3 The monstrous
1.4 Another choice of freedom
1.5 Abnormality as animality

2. Anormality as alienation

2.1 Counter-nature called into question
2.2 Objectivisation: the abnormal as objet of science
2.3 A familial definitionof abnormality
2.4 The abnormal as a contradictory being
2.5 The abnormal as alienated
2.6 Abnormality as dialectic of the same and the Other

Conclusion

Stage 4 The delinquent as abnormal

1. Normalisation and punishment

1.1 Punishment of the insignificant
1.2 Punishment as definition of abnormality
1.3 Punishment as establishment of a norm
1.4 Punishment as integration into the norm
1.5 A double polarity
1.6 Normalisation and the temporal goal

2. Normalisation and discipline

2.1 Definition of discipline
2.2 A normalising discipline

3. Moralisation and normalisation

3.1 By work
3.2 By wage

4. Examination and normalisation

4.1 Normalisation and creation of a space
4.2 Normalisation and creation of an architecture
4.3 Normalisation and surveillance
4.4 Normalisation and examination

5. The constructionof the figure of the delinquent

5.1 A transformation
5.2 The dangerous individual
5.3 A natural typology

6. The function of the abnormal

6.1 The creationof a closed world
6.2 A control of normality
6.3 A limited abnormality
6.4 A utilisation of abnormality

7. The carceral

7.1 Definition
7.2 A double effect

Conclusion

Stage 5 The Pervert

1. The origin of normalisation

1.1 From alliance system to sexuality system
1.2 From juridical system to system of the norm
1.3 From blood to sex

2. Who?

2.1 The pervert
2.2 The homosexual

3. How?

3.1 The four rules of the system
3.2 Normalisation as medical fact

3.3 Eugenism
3.4 Control
3.5 Confession

4. An extension of perversion

4.1 Multiplication of perversion
4.2 Fixation

Conclusion

Stage 6 A problemisation of normality

I. Philosophy as engaged activity
1.1 An engaged philosophy
1.2 The role of critique
1.3 The work of thought
1.4 A different figure of the intellectual

2. Eventialisation

2.1 Problemisation
2.2 Eventialisation
2.3 A Nietszchean inspiration

3. A resistance to power

3.1 What is power ?

3.2 Power and resistance
3.3 The three levels of power
3.4 An opposition to domination
3.5 Truth and power
3.6 The G. I. P

4. Work-on-the-self as protest

4.1 An aesthetic of existence
4.2 Work-on-the-self and power
4.3 A close interrogation of identity

Conclusion