DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Individual courses

Based on the firm belief that academic excellence should not be limited to those studying for a degree, the university takes pride in offering further education programmes (leading to Certificates of Advanced Study) and Individual Courses to anyone wishing to be immersed in the intellectual heritage of the Dominicans.

Certificates of Advanced Study and individual courses are validated in the same way as Bachelor level courses. A paper of 12000-16000 characters, including spaces is required for each course. The study duration for a certificate is 12 months, according to the pace and rhythm of each student, under supervision by a tutor.

Choose between:

  • 15 Certificates of Advanced Study, in Theological or Philosophical Studies
  • Over 500 Individual Courses

Choose your course by using the search engine and click on the title to see the detailed outline.

  • Accompanied courses – you have access to the learning platform and your studies will be supervised by an academic tutor. These courses are worth 3 ECTS credits which can be counted towards a study programme with Domuni or at another academic institution.
  • Read only courses: you will receive the PDF of your chosen course within 48 hours

Courses search

Fundamental Moral Theology

Fundamental Moral Theology

Distinctions need to be made regarding the subject of moral theology : first – as distinct from moral philosophy or ethics; second – as distinct from other theologica l studies.

Gerald O'Collins' Understanding of Symbols, Experience and Divine Revelation

Gerald O'Collins' Understanding of Symbols, Experience and Divine Revelation

An Accommodation for a Christian Approach to the World Religions and Interreligious Dialogue in the Line of Jacques Dupuis

Hegel - A systematic philosophy

Hegel - A systematic philosophy

The Hegelian philosophy presents itself as a system, a systematic knowledge. It is not the expression of a feeling or an intuition. Philosophy is a science, a knowledge. It's not a way of life like ancient philosophy...

Historical Books of the Old Testament

Historical Books of the Old Testament

In this course we look at the Hebrews’ arrival in the Promised Land and continue right up to the end of their existence as an independent nation when disaster overwhelmed them.

 

History of the Ecumenical Movement

History of the Ecumenical Movement

Like all movements, ecumenism had its beginnings and thus it has a history to be studied.

Human Rights 1. Individual and group rights

Human Rights 1. Individual and group rights

Often legislation is based on the consensus of the majority feeling of a group of people rather than on solid philosophical and theological arguments. This frequently leads to superficial legislation with short term benefits for a group of people, but long-term misery for all. The author of this book provides us with a foundation upon which healthy legislation can be built.

Human Rights in Africa

Human Rights in Africa

The notion of human rights refers to the norms, basic rights and freedom that protect people from political, economic, legal, and social abuses or unjustified infringements. There is clearly a profuse assertion of rights which individuals, groups and institutions make. Today, people encounter claims of rights frequently and in a greater variety than before. The main aim of this section is to help one understand the concept of “rights”. Having dealt with the notion of “rights” itself, this section will explore the categories and forms of rights in general. The section will conclude by discussing the concept of human rights.

Human Rights Part II: The catholic social teaching

Human Rights Part II: The catholic social teaching

Human dignity based on the concepts of the image of God and Christ’s redemption becomes the basis for human rights debate from a Christian theological perspective. It is in the community of the human family that a human person realizes his/her being the imago Dei.

Indian Philosophy Unit I

Indian Philosophy Unit I

The main objective of this unit is to get an above all understanding of what Indian Philosophy is and in what circumstances it has developed. Though Indian Philosophy has developed in different parts of India it has many common characteristics hence the student is likely to know a few important ones. Furthermore, one should have a basic understanding of what Indian philosophy is accused of.

Indian Philosophy Unit II

Indian Philosophy Unit II

What is expected from the students in this Unit is that they must be able to point out the importance of Vedas in Indian Philosophy, the classification of Vedic literature and must have a proper understanding of the Samhitās, Brāhmaṇas and Āraṇyakas. However, the Upaniśads will be dealt separately. Further, one must be acquainted with a few other important teachings of Veda such as Vedic religion, how monism developed from polytheism, and a basic understanding of what ṛta, the law of karma, the theory of creation, the institution of yajñaāśramas and varṇa is.

Indian Philosophy Unit III

Indian Philosophy Unit III

By Studying this particular unit one must be able to understand what is the meaning of Upaniṣad, how it was developed from Vedas and what are its main teachings and how they reach their logical culmination in the identity of the self and the Brahman. One must also be able to understand the Upaniṣadic view point of bondage and liberation along with the cosmogony and puruṣārtas.

The main objective of the conclusion is to introduce the students to the different systems of Indian Philosophy as it deals with various philosophical thoughts of several traditions originated in Indian Subcontinent.

International Criminal Law

International Criminal Law

This course examines the general principles of international criminal law, providing a practical and theoretical framework for the rules, concepts and legal constructs key to the subject. Jurisprudence will be included to assist the student to fully understand the core concept of international criminal law.

 

International Humanitarian Law

International Humanitarian Law

The course seeks to explain the concept, nature and history of International Humanitarian Law (“IHL”) in such a manner that the student will become familiar with its operations in international law. Some concrete case studies will be included to assist the student to fully understand the core concept of IHL.
Wars have been waged from time immemorial and its practice continues to change over time. Our interest in this module is the law regulating conflicts.

International Marketing and E-business

International Marketing and E-business

This course will cover some fundamentals questions: Why companies should go international? Is it a benefit for them? Whatis an international product strategy? How can a company adapt its product to the new market? Should we create a new product or maintain a similar product?

International Public Law

International Public Law

This course intends to provide students with an overview of international law and the structure of the international legal system.

 

Introduction to Catholic Tradition

Introduction to Catholic Tradition

This course gives a survey on the Catholic tradition by examining a series of documents like Lumen Gentium and other documents of Vatican II.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

The modern epistemological problem has two aspects:

1. The opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error. We find this basically in Descartes and Kant.

2. The conflict between science and science or that of contemporary and classic physics and not an opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error.

Introduction to Fundamental Theology

Introduction to Fundamental Theology

We derive our inspiration from at least two distinct traditions: the Jewish and the Christian. It is important that we should be aware of this! A whole set of questions are implied here. What is the relationship between God and the Jewish traditi on, God and Jesus, God and the church?

Introduction to international human rights law: Theory and practice

Introduction to international human rights law:   Theory and practice

As an introductory course on contemporary challenges in international human rights law, the course is designed to offer basic insights on various topics.  Students are encouraged to do further reading so as to deepen and expand their appreciation of the complexity that characterises the various topics.

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