DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Bachelor in Philosophy - Year three

Bachelor in Philosophy - Year Three

Credits: 60

Length: 1 year (can be spread over 2 calendar years)

Degree type: BA Domuni University

The third year of the Bachelor's aims to explore the full ramifications of philosophical thought through introductions to various modern and contemporary philosophers.

Although they often address almost identical questions, it is interesting to see how different philosophers constitute independent worlds of thought. Each philosopher constitutes a form of synthesis, of global vision, unified around a strong and central thought.

This begs the question: can dialogue exist between these various worlds or is thought exploded in heterogeneous universes?

At the end of the third year, students demonstrate their capacity for critical thought and philosophical understanding through a final paper. This is the chance for students to show what they have learned throughout the bachelor's, and prove that they are ready to undertake postgraduate studies.

List of Courses

Bioethics 1 : Foundations of Modern Bioethics

Bioethics 1 : Foundations of Modern Bioethics

Legal basis: enforcement of duty on investigators

Philosophical basis: emphasizes principles on which actions are based/justified

Moral basis: Determining which actions are good and allowed or bad and proscribed (in the context of research).

Bioethics II : Informed Consent and Risk Analysis

Bioethics II : Informed Consent and Risk Analysis

Investigators have a duty to ensure subjects give not only informed, but voluntary consent?

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Concerned with restoring and strengthening bonds between professionals, patients and families, not simply dealing with principles like bioethics.
Uses cases and relies on the clinician-patient relationships/encounters in contributing to research on ethical issues

Philosophy of Religion 1st part

Philosophy of Religion 1st part

PH0002 Philosophy of religion is also known as philosophical theology or philosophy of God. Other names include natural theology and theodicy.

The validation of the course is done at the end of the second part

Philosophy of Religion 2nd part

Philosophy of Religion 2nd part

PH0002 Philosophy of religion is also known as philosophical theology or philosophy of God. Other names include natural theology and theodicy.

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

According to Gibelin in his Foreword to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Freedom is the central theme of Kant’s philosophy. This course will introduce to Kant, centering on Freedom as a key concept to understand his philosophy, in the three spheres defined by the critical project: Metaphysics, Moral and Aesthetics.

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

The norm is the idea central to the thought of Michel Foucault. It is the point from which he studies modern society. He distinguishes the norm from other forms of power.

Hinduism

Hinduism

There are many different spiritual pathways that were born in the Indian sub-continent: Buddhist, Jain, Sikh, for example, and others that came to India such as Christian and Muslim. Hindu spirituality which represents the spiritual quest of the vast majority of the people of India is rooted in the relentless and uninterrupted search of the seers from the Indian sub-continent.

Philosophy of Language

Philosophy of Language

PH0006 This course seeks to introduce students to some attempts at outlining the definition and purpose of philosophy of language. From there students will be taken through some traditional problems of philosophy of language such as theories of meaning, reference and denoting, and how these have been debated. The importance of language as a communicative tool that conveys meaning and intentions as well as our own understanding of the world is obvious. This course will seek to take students through this importance from a philosophical perspective.

Analytic Philosophy

Analytic Philosophy

PH0007 This course seeks to introduce students to analytic philosophy. Students will be taken through some attempts at defining what analytic philosophy is, in particular how analytic philosophy understands philosophical problems and its own suggestions at approaching those problems. Then students will be led through an example of a debate in analytic philosophy. We will look at Strawson’s paper on referring and Russell’s response to it. The rest of the course will look at various topics considered proper to analytic philosophy.

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Logic equips individuals with the required skills to identify errors, known as fallacies in an argument. Logic generally studies the relations the mind creates between different products or contents of intellectual knowledge; that is perceptions, propositions and arguments, and seeks to understand the different relations, which arise in the human mind when it knows things

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Logic equips individuals with the required skills to identify errors, known as fallacies in an argument. Logic generally studies the relations the mind creates between different products or contents of intellectual knowledge; that is perceptions, propositions and arguments, and seeks to understand the different relations, which arise in the human mind when it knows things