DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Bachelor 2 Philosophy

Bachelor in Philosophy - Year two

Length: 1 year (can be spread over 2 calendar years)

Preparing for degree: Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy 

Year 2 of Online, Distance Learning, Bachelor’s in Philosophy

COURSE CONTENT

You can download the above detailed program in PDF format for Year 2 of the Bachelor's in Philosophy.

At the bottom of this page is the list of courses. By clicking on the title of each, you can see the course presentation and the detailed outline of each course.

TO VALIDATE THE COMPLETION OF YEAR 2 OF BACHELOR’S IN PHILOSOPHY

Take the quiz for each course

Submit 10 assignments/papers for the different courses studied

Take the two in-person exams (semester 3 exam, semester 4 exam). Each exam covers all the courses validated by an assignment in the semester concerned. Foreign language courses are not included in the exam.

 

SEMESTER 3: MODERN PHILOSOPHY, FROM HERITAGE TO GOING BEYOND

OBJECTIVES

To present modern philosophy in this pivotal period for thought.

To show how modern philosophy takes shape in ancient and medieval philosophy, in order to better emancipate itself from it.

To illustrate these facts in the fields of politics, religion and the philosophy of knowledge.

To follow this movement of ideas through Pascal, Descartes and Spinoza.

ACQUIRED COMPETENCIES

Being able to use basic philosophical concepts and references to ancient texts in a presentation on ethics.

Understanding the importance of philosophical thought in relation to the organization of the city.

Being able to compare Pascal's and Descartes' thinking on the concept of the subject, and therefore of the person.

Being able to perceive the audacity of Spinoza's thought and the existential risks he took to expose it.

SEMESTER 4: PHILOSOPHY AND MODERN SCIENCE

OBJECTIVES

To address the status of knowledge. What is knowing? Should we return to experience?

To examine the influence of the development of science on philosophy.

To deal with these questions through two general philosophy courses, one in logic and one in epistemology, where the student will deepen the interaction between philosophy and science.

To go into the work of two major philosophers: Kant and Hegel.

ACQUIRED COMPETENCIES:

Becoming familiar with the various developments in logic

Being able to analyze the contemporary problems of religious radicalism in the light of Voltaire's reflection on fanaticism.

Being able to perceive the historical relationship between the philosophers Hegel, Kierkegaard and Marx.

Understanding the particularity of each of them.

FLEXIBILITY

Enrollment happens daily. As soon as the registration process is completed, students receive a code that allows them to access the Domoodle teaching platform and begin studying. Each academic year can be spread over two calendar years without the need to re-enroll or pay tuition fees again.

 

List of Courses

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy I

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy I

Can we be both Christians and genuine philosophers? Are faith and philosophy mutually exclusive, or not?

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy II

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy II

Can we be both Christians and genuine philosophers? Are faith and philosophy mutually exclusive, or not?

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

The modern epistemological problem has two aspects:

1. The opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error. We find this basically in Descartes and Kant.

2. The conflict between science and science or that of contemporary and classic physics and not an opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

The term ‘anthropology’ is derived from two Greek words: ἀνθωπος (anthrōpos) and λογος (logos). 

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

This course is the second part to Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics I.
The course will introduce the students to the historical beginning of bioethics, as well as some of the moral theories employed in bioethics discourse.

Philosophy of Language

Philosophy of Language

This course seeks to introduce students to some attempts at outlining the definition and purpose of philosophy of language. 

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

This course will take students through ethical discourse from the time of Plato to Aristotle, then to Kant and utilitarians. 

John Locke's Epistemology and Political Philosophy

John Locke's Epistemology and Political Philosophy

John Locke : seventeenth century English philosopher, one of the greatest Enlightenment thinkers and forerunner of Liberalism and British Empiricism. 

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

This is a comprehensive and systematic course on the philosophy of David Hume – a prominent Scottish Enlightenment philosopher widely known for his influential system of philosophical empiricism, naturalism and scepticism. Based on his influential and extreme Empiricist ideas, Hume can be rightly considered as one of the most important philosophers of all time.

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

Aesthetics is a wider term which includes all kinds of objects and experiences of art, beauty and life. There are many interconnected terms to the process of understanding and the enjoyment of beauty. Artistic experience, philosophy of art, philosophy of beauty, and philosophy of aesthetics are some of the different branches of aesthetics from a general perspective.

 

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Logic equips individuals with the required skills to identify errors, known as fallacies in an argument. Logic generally studies the relations the mind creates between different products or contents of intellectual knowledge; that is perceptions, propositions and arguments, and seeks to understand the different relations, which arise in the human mind when it knows things. This comprehensible course on logic is divided into two parts: the second part (sections III and IV) on formal logic focus on the core aspects of categorical syllogisms.  

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Just as pertinent knowledge and expertise are required when making right decisions and choices, certain skills and rules are necessary when attempting to reason correctly. Equipping one with logical skills and rules is the major aim of logic or philosophy of logic. This comprehensible course on logic is divided into two parts: the first part (sections I and II) give an overview of logic and common informal fallacies.