DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

M2 in theology concentration Philosophy

Master 2 Concentration: Philosophy

Credits: 60

Length: 1 year (can be spread over 2 calendar years)

Preparing for degree: Master of Arts in Philosophy 

Entry requirements: MA1 in Religious Studies or MA1 in Theology (or equivalent)

Choose 4 courses and 1 research seminar from below - to be approved by the Director of Studies

Master 2 involves a thesis of 350 000 characters - (including spaces). Students will then complete an oral thesis defense in front of an academic jury.

 

Choose 4 courses from below and one research seminar, in accordance with the Director of Studies.

 

List of Courses

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato ranks as one of the most important thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition. This module introduces the student to some of the fundamental ideas that inform his works as well as guiding the student through some developments in his presentation of these ideas.

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

This course introduces some of the key elements in Aristotle's thought. It will consider, among other things, Aristotle on language, logic, “first philosophy” or “wisdom”, and effective choice and action. In the appendices, Aristotle on language and logic in the Organon, on nature in the Physics, on “first philosophy” or “wisdom” in the Metaphysics, and on effective choice and action in the Nichomachean Ethics will be considered.

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy I

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy I

Can we be both Christians and genuine philosophers? Are faith and philosophy mutually exclusive, or not?

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy II

A Brief History of Medieval Philosophy II

Can we be both Christians and genuine philosophers? Are faith and philosophy mutually exclusive, or not?

Metaphysics - Part 1

Metaphysics - Part 1

Metaphysics is the study of things in their ultimate causes. As such, the specialty of metaphysics is that it seeks the final explanation or the ultimate causes of things precisely in so far as they are, in so far as they exist, or in so far as they are real. Aristotle called it “First Philosophy” or “Theology” since it leads to the first principle or the ultimate explanation of all things.

Metaphysics - Part 2

Metaphysics - Part 2

All human knowledge begins with sense experience but can terminate sometimes in the senses, or in the imagination or in the intellect alone . Accordingly we can distinguish between three levels of scientific knowledge corresponding to the three degrees of abstraction from matter which can be made by the intellect in its examination of reality.

Foundations of Ethics

Foundations of Ethics

Ethics, like philosophy, is in search of principles and universals. Ethics reflects on a particular human experience, namely, the experience of the good or of being good, and sets it in the context of the whole. One could also say that ethics reflects on what is the good and how our lives are oriented towards it

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Bioethics III: Clinical Ethics & Legal Implications

Concerned with restoring and strengthening bonds between professionals, patients and families, not simply dealing with principles like bioethics.
Uses cases and relies on the clinician-patient relationships/encounters in contributing to research on ethical issues

Social and political philosophy

Social and political philosophy

There are many different definitions of Social Political Philosophy (SPP): the political can be defined as social decision making; philosophy is the most general form of inquiry that is the attempt to say what it is true and why. 

Philosophy of Religion Part I

Philosophy of Religion Part I

Philosophy of Religion is also known as Philosophical Theology or Philosophy of God. Other names include Natural Theology and Theodicy.

The validation of the course is done at the end of the second part.

Philosophy of Religion Part II

Philosophy of Religion Part II

Philosophy of Religion is also known as Philosophical Theology or Philosophy of God. Other names include natural Theology and Theodicy.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

The modern epistemological problem has two aspects:

1. The opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error. We find this basically in Descartes and Kant.

2. The conflict between science and science or that of contemporary and classic physics and not an opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error.

The Origins of Philosophy (Presocratics)

The Origins of Philosophy (Presocratics)

This course is divided into six sections : What is Philosophy? ; Why Study Philosophy? ; The place of philosophy in theology ; Main Areas of Philosophy ; Presocratic Philosophy ; Socrates

Thomas Aquinas Studies

Thomas Aquinas Studies

A specialised course in Thomistic issues by fr. Gilles Emery, OP,  a leading specialist in this discipline !

For MA students only

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

According to Gibelin in his Foreword to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Freedom is the central theme of Kant’s philosophy. This course will introduce to Kant, centering on Freedom as a key concept to understand his philosophy, in the three spheres defined by the critical project: Metaphysics, Moral and Aesthetics.

Issues in Genomic Research

Issues in Genomic Research

This course will explore some of the ethical and social issues in genomic research; Specific emphasis will be placed on incidental findings, as well as how to manage such findings/information when they arise within genomic research.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

The term ‘anthropology’ is derived from two Greek words: ἀνθωπος (anthrōpos) and λογος (logos). The former (anthrōpos) refers to ‘man’ in the generic sense, that is to say, it means ‘human being’; the latter (logos) signifies ‘discourse’ or ‘science. Philosophical anthropology is thus concerned with a philosophical account of the mystery of the human being. Naturally, the history of philosophy has produced a wealth of approaches and an abundance of profound insights concerning the human being. It has also given rise to numerous errors in this regard.
This course will engage the question of how we are to construe the relationship that obtains between body and soul/mind. Rather than adopting a purely historical approach, beginning with Aristotle,
the text begins with an exposition of three different contemporary treatments of this issue before proceeding to expound important aspects of Aristotle’s and St. Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysics of human nature.

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics I

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics I

This course will introduce the students to the historical beginning of bioethics, as well as some of the moral theories employed in bioethics discourse. Specifically, this course will:

• Highlight some of the ethical misconducts in modern human history
• Highlight some basic moral principles of research and clinical encounters with human subjects
• Provide insights into how these principles are employed in concrete human contexts.
 

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

This course is the second part to Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics I.

The course will introduce the students to the historical beginning of bioethics, as well as some of the moral theories employed in bioethics discourse. Specifically, this course will:

• Highlight some of the ethical misconducts in modern human history
• Highlight some basic moral principles of research and clinical encounters with human subjects
• Provide insights into how these principles are employed in concrete human contexts.
 

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics I

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics I

To show the implications of normative theories for specific moral issues or contemporary debates on particular ethical issues.

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics II

Contemporary Issues in Bioethics II

To show the implications of normative theories for specific moral issues or contemporary debates on particular ethical issues.

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

Michel Foucault, analyst of the norm, 1926-1984

The norm is the idea central to the thought of Michel Foucault. It is the point from which he studies modern society. He distinguishes the norm from other forms of power.

Newman's Theory of Doctrinal Development

Newman's Theory of Doctrinal Development

Application of the Newmanian Criteriology on the Axiom Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus

Hinduism

Hinduism

There are many different spiritual pathways that were born in the Indian sub-continent: Buddhist, Jain, Sikh, for example, and others that came to India such as Christian and Muslim. Hindu spirituality which represents the spiritual quest of the vast majority of the people of India is rooted in the relentless and uninterrupted search of the seers from the Indian sub-continent.

SEM39 - Colonialism and mission in sub-Saharan Africa

SEM39 - Colonialism and mission in sub-Saharan Africa

History of Christianity Seminar
April 22nd - June 16th, 2019
presented by Philippe Denis

FROM 22ND APRIL  2019 TO 16TH JUNE 2019. SEMINAR CLOSED

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

This is a comprehensive and systematic course on the philosophy of David Hume – a prominent Scottish Enlightenment philosopher widely known for his influential system of philosophical empiricism, naturalism and scepticism. Based on his influential and extreme Empiricist ideas, Hume can be rightly considered as one of the most important philosophers of all time.

Introduction to philosophy of law

Introduction to philosophy of law

Important issues in legal philosophy range from abstract conceptual questions about the nature of law and legal systems, to normative questions about the relationship between law and morality, politics and other norms as well as the justification of various legal institutions. Although this course will deal with conceptual themes of philosophy of law especially in the first section, the course generally focusses on the practical and readily applicable aspects of the field.

E-Seminar: Upholding Human Rights and Justice Today: Religion, Media, and NGOs

E-Seminar: Upholding Human Rights and Justice Today: Religion, Media, and NGOs

SEM - Human Rights, Philosophy and Religious Studies

4th October - 29th November 2021 

presented by Isaac Mutelo