DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Theology and Philosophy

Theology and Philosophy

Credits: 15

Diploma : Theology and Philosophy

Access: There are no prerequisites for these short courses. The course material is university level.

Length of Studies: Students have 24 months from the date of enrolment in which to validate the diploma.

Validation: Each of the five courses is assessed by a 5 page written assignment. The diploma is worth 15 ECTS.
 

Diploma : Theology and Philosophy

Are you ready to take a journey in theology? This diploma offers an introduction to thought and the search for truth and progresses onto the study of Christ, the Revelation. A well constructed course, logical in development and wide ranging enough to offer a good overview of key areas of basic theological study.

This introductory diploma follows the classical structure of theological studies. The first two units focuses on the science of knowledge and its objective value. It offers the opportunity to study areas such as the doctrine of realism, truth and error, the intellect and their senses. This provides a sound basis for progressing onto the modules concerning the Revelation, which are approached through the study of Biblical passages, through Pauline and Johannine writings, the Church Fathers and the great Councils. The final section of the course confronts students with an approach to the challenge of inculturation: In the 21st century Christianity is lived in new contexts: In Asia, Africa, Latin America, and within the context of religious pluralism

Theology and Philosophy

- Introduction to critical thinking 1
- Introduction to critical thinking 2
- Christology 1
- Christology 2
- Christology 3
 

List of Courses

Christology Part One

Christology Part One

In this first course on Christology we look primarily at the Jesus of the Gospels, particularly the Synoptic Gospels: his life, death, and resurrection.

Christology Part Two

Christology Part Two

In the previous course on Christology we have looked primarily at the Jesus of the Gospels, particularly the Synoptic Gospels: his life, death, and resurrection. We now will look more closely at how Jesus Christ, following upon his resurrection, and the disciples’ experience of the risen Jesus, gets handed on,-first within the New Testament itself by St. Paul and the Gospel of John,- but then later in the early Church picking up with those themes and developing them,- and also clarifying them in its conciliar teaching.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

Introduction to critical thinking. Part II

The modern epistemological problem has two aspects:

1. The opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error. We find this basically in Descartes and Kant.

2. The conflict between science and science or that of contemporary and classic physics and not an opposition between science and philosophy or truth and error.

Christology, part Three

Christology, part Three

We have considered christologies in the New Testament, and in the early Church, as well as that of Thomas Aquinas as representative of the Middle Ages. How best to hand on the good news of who Jesus is gets re-thought throughout the centuries, always grounded in the previous Tradtion, but also respectful of new challenges. So in the twentieth century, thinking about Jesusfinds new contexts: Asia, Africa, Latin America, within feminist thought, within the context of religious pluralism. Christology, as all theology, confronts the challenge of inculturation. We present only a few efforts to think about Christology in these new contexts.