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Gerald O'Collins' Understanding of Symbols, Experience and Divine Revelation

Gerald O'Collins' Understanding of Symbols, Experience and Divine Revelation

Considering that the divine revelation always takes place in the form of symbols and within human experience, I also study O’Collins’ understanding of symbols and experience, and their relationship with the divine revelation.

How can we access the reality of revelation when both symbols and experience are historically, socially,and religiously conditioned and limited? What is the role of symbols in both the communication of the divine revelation by God and its experience by human beings?

ECTS Credits: 3
Professor: Fr Tam Nguyen OP

Table of contents

CHAPTER I    INTRODUCTION

1. Statement of the Problem

2. Objective of the Course

3. Scope of the Course

4. Significance of the Study

5. Survey of Related Literature

6. Definition of Terms a. “Mediat or” b. “Pluralism” c. “Salvation” d. “Theology of Religions” e. “Unique” or “Uniqueness”

7. Division of the Course

CHAPTER II O’COLLINS’ UNDERSTANDING OF SYMBOLS AND EXPERIENCE

1. Definition of Symbol

2. The Distinction between the Symbol and the Symbolized

3. The Distinction between Signs and Symbols

4. Historical and Revelatory Character of Symbols a. God’s Self - Communication through Symbo ls b. The Power of Symbols c. Credibility of Symbols

5. The Subject of Experience a. Experience, Sense, and Knowledge b. The Immediacy of Experience c. Individual and Collective Experience

6. The Experience Itself a. The Meaning of Experien ce b. The Purposefulness or Finality of Experience c. The Concreteness of Experience d. The Newness of Experience e. Pos itive and Negative Experience – An Ambiguous Classification

7. The “Aftermath or Consequences” of Experience a. The Discernment of Experience b. The Inter pretation of Experience c. The Expression of Experience d. Memory and Experience

8. Religious Experience a. Transcendent al Experience - “Lower Case” Religious Experience b. “Upper Case” Religious Experience c. Primordial Faith and Self - Conscious Faith

9. Concluding Remarks

CHAPTER III O’ COLLINS’ UNDERSTANDING OF THE DIVINE REVELATION

1. Revelation: Propositional or Interpersonal?

2. Revelation Is Both Informative and Effective

3. Revelation within Human Experience

4. Means and Mediators of Revelation a. Means of Revelation 1) Common and Unco mmon Experiences 2) Positive and Negative Experiences 3) Time, Nature and History 3 b. Mediators of Revelation c. Acts of God in Historical Events d. Prophetic Experiences

5. Divine Revelation before Jesus Christ, with Jesus Christ, and after Jesus Christ a. Preparation in th e Old Testament History b. Jesus of Nazareth, The Climax of God’s Saving Revelation 1) The Uniqueness of the Apostolic Experience of the Divine Self - Communication in Jesus Christ 2) Jesus’ Origin and Mission from the Father c. Post - Apostolic Revelation or the Continuity of Revelation d. “Foundational” and “Dependent” Revelation “Mediate” and “Immediate” Revelation? “Revelation” and “Manifestation” or “Communication?” “Foundational” and “Participant” Revelation? “Foundational” and “Dependent” Revelation The End of Foundational Revelation

6. Revelation and Scriptures a. Scriptures - Witness and Interpretation o f Revelation b. Revelation Goes beyond the Scriptures c. Scriptures - Living Word of God for Us Today

7. Revelation, Scriptures and Tradition a. Tradition as a Human Reality b. Christian Tradition – a Human and Divine Reality c. Tradition – the Prerequisite of the Scriptures d. Tradition Includes the Scriptures

8. Revelation and Faith a. Faith Presupposes Confession of, Commitment to, and Confidence in God’s Revelation b. Fa ith, the Result of the Preached Word and Interior Grace c. The Role of Reason in Faith 1) The Necessity of Reason in the Human Move toward Faith 2) The Es sential but Limited Role of Reason d. Knowing, Loving and Hoping in Faith’s Response 1) The Interaction of Confession, Commitment and Hope 2) Confession, Commitment and Hope to and in Christ

9. Concluding Remarks

CHAPTER IV O’COLLINS’ UNDERSTANDING OF SYMBOLS, EXPERIENCE AND REVELATION A THEOLOGICAL BASIS FOR THE THEOLOGY OF RELIGIONS IN TH E CASE OF JACQUES DUPUIS

1. History as the History of Salvation a. Salvation History and World History b. Covenants and Other Religious Traditions c. The Relationship between the Covenants

2. God’s Presence in History a. God’s Presence in and through Jesus Christ 1) The Uni versality of the Logos, Christ 2) The Universality and Particularity of Jesus Christ b. God’s Presence in and through the Holy Spirit c. God’s Presence in the Church 1) Human Orientation to, and Relation with, the Church 2) The Church, Universal Mediation? 3) The Church, Sacrament of the Kingdom of God

3. Non - Christian Religions in the Divine Economy of Revelation and Salvation a. The World Religions and God’s Economy of Revelation 1) The Universality of Div ine Revelation 4) The Scriptures of the World Religions - Bearers of God’s Revelation b. Non - Christian Religions, Ways of Salvation 1) A Common Ultimate G oal 2) “Many and Various Ways” c. The Expression of Saving Values and Their Convergence Gerald O’Collins’ understanding of symbols Nguyen Van T huy (Joachim Tam) © Copyrights www.domuni.eu 4 1) Discerning Saving Values 2) “ Complementary Values and Convergent Paths”

4. Concluding Remarks

CHAPTER V CONCLUSION

BIBLIOGRAPHY

I. Primary Sources: II. Other Sources 1. Documents of the Church a. Conciliar Documents b. Papal Documents: c. Documents of the Roman Curia and of the FABC: 2. Books 3. Articles