DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Diploma in Philosophy

Philosophy

Credits: 15

Diploma : Philosophy

Access: There are no prerequisites for these short courses. The course material is university level.

Length of Studies: Students have 24 months from the date of enrolment in which to validate the diploma.

Validation: Each of the five courses is assessed by a 5 page written assignment. The diploma is worth 15 ECTS.

Diploma in Philosophy

The study of « the love of Wisdom » has long been accepted as the foundation of theological study. These carefully chosen 5 courses offer students the opportunity to explore this science by offering a structured and guided study of some of some well know philosophes.

The first two courses look at metaphysics. Metaphysics is the study of things in their ultimate causes. Aristotle called Metaphysics “first philosophy” or “theology” since it leads to the first principle or the ultimate explanation of all things.

Plato ranks as one of the most important thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition, and we are pleased to offer this course on Plato in this diploma. This course introduces the student to some of the fundamental ideas that inform his works as well as guiding the student through some developments in his presentation of these ideas. The subsequent two courses look at some of the key elements in Aristotle's thought and the key ideas of Kant., notably Freedom as a key concept to understand his philosophy.

Philosophy

Metaphysics 1
Metaphysics 2
Plato
Aristotle
Kant
 

List of Courses

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato - A Way of Life

Plato ranks as one of the most important thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition. This module introduces the student to some of the fundamental ideas that inform his works as well as guiding the student through some developments in his presentation of these ideas.

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition

This course introduces some of the key elements in Aristotle's thought. It will consider, among other things, Aristotle on language, logic, “first philosophy” or “wisdom”, and effective choice and action. In the appendices, Aristotle on language and logic in the Organon, on nature in the Physics, on “first philosophy” or “wisdom” in the Metaphysics, and on effective choice and action in the Nichomachean Ethics will be considered.

Metaphysics - Part 1

Metaphysics - Part 1

Metaphysics is the study of things in their ultimate causes. As such, the specialty of metaphysics is that it seeks the final explanation or the ultimate causes of things precisely in so far as they are, in so far as they exist, or in so far as they are real. Aristotle called it “First Philosophy” or “Theology” since it leads to the first principle or the ultimate explanation of all things.

Metaphysics - Part 2

Metaphysics - Part 2

All human knowledge begins with sense experience but can terminate sometimes in the senses, or in the imagination or in the intellect alone . Accordingly we can distinguish between three levels of scientific knowledge corresponding to the three degrees of abstraction from matter which can be made by the intellect in its examination of reality.

Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

PH0001 The course aims to show that from its origins through the early efforts made by the earliest oriental thinkers before the era of ancient great Greek thinkers, philosophy has remained a branch of knowledge concerned with fundamental questions concerning existence, human values, language, knowledge and many other matters.

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Introduction to critical thinking. Part I

Etymologically, the word "Epistemology", from the Greek, means the science of knowledge. It is an investigation of knowledge and its problems. A synonymous term is Criteriology which again from the Greek means to distinguish or judge. It deals with testin g knowledge to find truth or detect error.

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

Kant: A philosophy of Freedom

According to Gibelin in his Foreword to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Freedom is the central theme of Kant’s philosophy. This course will introduce to Kant, centering on Freedom as a key concept to understand his philosophy, in the three spheres defined by the critical project: Metaphysics, Moral and Aesthetics.

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics II

This course is the second part to Introduction to Moral theories in Bioethics I.

The course will introduce the students to the historical beginning of bioethics, as well as some of the moral theories employed in bioethics discourse. Specifically, this course will:

• Highlight some of the ethical misconducts in modern human history
• Highlight some basic moral principles of research and clinical encounters with human subjects
• Provide insights into how these principles are employed in concrete human contexts.
 

Being and Knowing

Being and Knowing

PH0008 Essential Questions of Philosophy in this very complete course about Being and Knowing.

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

Ethics: from Ancient to Modern

This course will take students through ethical discourse from the time of Plato to Aristotle, then to Kant and utilitarians. The principal aim of this course is to make students aware of the different traditions or approaches to ethics. Students can then be able to compare some of the most influential ethical theorists in human history.

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

David Hume: The Great Empiricist

PH009 - This is a comprehensive and systematic course on the philosophy of David Hume – a prominent Scottish Enlightenment philosopher widely known for his influential system of philosophical empiricism, naturalism and scepticism. Based on his influential and extreme Empiricist ideas, Hume can be rightly considered as one of the most important philosophers of all time.

Metaphysics or Philosophy of Being

Metaphysics or Philosophy of Being

PHI00012 - Metaphysics, a discipline with long standing history, has been understood in different ways. Traditionally, it is considered as the most general and fundamental discipline of all other disciplines. Metaphysics or the Philosophy of Being as Being seeks to answer questions about existence. 

EPISTEMOLOGY

EPISTEMOLOGY

PHI0009 Etymologically, the word Epistemology is derived from two Greek words episteme (knowledge) and logos (the science of knowledge). Thus the word ‘Epistemology’ would mean knowledge of knowledge or science of knowledge and is more commonly called a theory of knowledge. This philosophical term is commonly associated with the inquiry of truth and knowledge.

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

FIXEN020 Aesthetics is a wider term which includes all kinds of objects and experiences of art, beauty and life. There are many interconnected terms to the process of understanding and the enjoyment of beauty. Artistic experience, philosophy of art, philosophy of beauty, and philosophy of aesthetics are some of the different branches of aesthetics from a general perspective.

 

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Philosophy of Logic Part I

Logic equips individuals with the required skills to identify errors, known as fallacies in an argument. Logic generally studies the relations the mind creates between different products or contents of intellectual knowledge; that is perceptions, propositions and arguments, and seeks to understand the different relations, which arise in the human mind when it knows things

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Philosophy of Logic Part II

Logic equips individuals with the required skills to identify errors, known as fallacies in an argument. Logic generally studies the relations the mind creates between different products or contents of intellectual knowledge; that is perceptions, propositions and arguments, and seeks to understand the different relations, which arise in the human mind when it knows things

Introduction to philosophy of law

Introduction to philosophy of law

Important issues in legal philosophy range from abstract conceptual questions about the nature of law and legal systems, to normative questions about the relationship between law and morality, politics and other norms as well as the justification of various legal institutions. Although this course will deal with conceptual themes of philosophy of law especially in the first section, the course generally focusses on the practical and readily applicable aspects of the field.