DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Human Rights 2. A Christian view

Human Rights 2. A Christian view

Human dignity based on the concepts of the image of God and Christ’s redemption becomes the basis for human rights debate from a Christian theological perspective. It is in the community of the human family that a human person realizes his/her being the imago Dei.

ECTS Credits: 3

Professor: John Kusumalayam

CHAPTER 3  A CHRISTIAN VIEW ON THE FOUNDATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

 

3.1. Human Rights and Human Dignity

3.1.1. Human Dignity in the UN Documents

3.1.2. What is Meant by “Human Dignity” in the UN Documents?

3.1.3. Human Rights Derive from Human Dignity

3.1.4. The Neutral and Open-ended Position Taken by the UN

3.1.5. From ‘Human Dignity’ to ‘Image of God’ for a Theological Understanding of Human Rights

3.1.6. Human Dignity and Imago Dei

3.2. Human Person as the Imago dei

3.2.1. The  Substantialist Understanding

3.2.2. Functional Understanding

3.2.3. Relational Understanding

3.2.4. A Holistic Conception of the ‘Image of God’ – Man in his Totality

3.2.5. “Male and Female He Created Them” – ‘Image of God’ and Women

3.3. The  Concept of  Imago Trinitatis

3.3.1. Human Person as the ‘Image of the Trinity’

  • Augustine and the “Image of the Trinity”
  • Thomas Aquinas and the “Image of the Trinity”

3.3.2. Human Communities and Humanity as the ‘Image of the Trinity’

3.3.3. The Whole Creation as the Bearer of the Traces of the Trinity

3.4. The Inner Dynamics of Trinitarian Life

3.4.1. CLASSICAL THEOLOGY

3.4.2. The Doctrine On Trinity In the Eastern and Western  Traditions

3.4.2.1. Perichoresis

3.4.2.2. Theosis 

3.4.2.2.1. The  Scriptural Background

3.4.2.2.2. The Patristic Background

3.4.2.2.3. ‘Theosis’ and the Human Person as the ‘Image and Likeness’ of God

3.4.2.2.4. Christocentric Theosis

 

CHAPTER 4  THE IMPLICATIONS OF IMAGO DEI-TRINITATIS

 

4.1. Implications for Understanding the Human Person

4.1.1. Achieving Fullness of Personhood is to Become Really the Imago Trinitatis

4.1.2. Human Person is Essentially Relational

4.1.2.1. Relation with God

4.1.2.2. Relation with Other Human Beings

4.1.2.3. Relation with the Whole of Creation

4.1.2.3.1. Meaning of ‘Subduing’ and ‘Ruling over’

4.1.2.3.2. Human Stewardship

  • Stewardship Is to Be Co-Creator with God
  • Stewardship Is a Call to Responsibility and Accountability
  • Stewardship Is a Call to Be the Servant of Creation

4.2. Implications for the Uniqueness of the Individual Human  Person 

4.3.  Conclusion 

 

CHAPTER 5. A CATHOLIC HUMAN RIGHTS THEORY FOUNDED ON THE CONCEPT OF IMAGO TRINITATIS

5.1. Towards Recognition of Human Rights in the Catholic Social Teaching

5.2. Bases of Human Rights in the Recent Catholic Social Teaching

5.3. The Use of the Concept of Imago Trinitatis in the Recent Catholic Human Rights Teaching 

5.4. A Holistic, Integral Theory of Human Rights

5.5. The Essential Features of a Reconstructed Theory of Human Rights

5.5.1. An Individualist Notion of Human Rights Is Inadequate

5.5.2. Human Persons Called to Be-with Others—Solidarity

5.5.3. Human Persons Called to Be-for Others—Responsibility

5.5.4. Human Persons Called to Be Equal—Equality

5.5.5. Human Persons Called to Be Capable—Empowerment

5.5.6. Unity and Indivisibility of Human Rights

5.5.7. Universality and  Inalienability

5.6.  Conclusion 

6. GENERAL  CONCLUSION