DOMUNI UNIVERSITAS

Human Rights 1. Individual and group rights

Human Rights 1. Individual and group rights

Often legislation is based on the consensus of the majority feeling of a group of people rather than on solid philosophical and theological arguments. This frequently leads to superficial legislation with short term benefits for a group of people, but long-term misery for all. The author of this book provides us with a foundation upon which healthy legislation can be built.

ECTS Credits: 3

Professor: John Kusumalayam

GENERAL  INTRODUCTION

  1. Aim of the Research
  2. The Research Hypotheses
  3. Research Questions
  4. The Structure of the Research
  5. The Research Methodology
  6. Limitations of this Research
  7. Presuppositions in this research

CHAPTER 1 THE CONCEPT AND NATURE OF HUMAN RIGHTS

1.1. What do we mean by ‘Rights’?

1.1.1. Rights As ‘Claims’

1.1.2. Rights As ‘Entitlements’

1.1.3.  Rights As  ‘Liberties’ Or  ‘Freedoms’

1.1.4. Rights As ‘Interests’

1.1.5. Rights – A ‘Holistic’ View?

1.2. What Do We Mean by ‘Human’?

1.2.1. ‘Human Being’ and ‘Human  Person’

1.2.1.1. Human Being

1.2.1.2. Human Person

1.2.2. Characteristics of the Human Person

1.2.2.1. Complex Unity/Totality of Spirit and Body

1.2.2.2. Relationality/Sociality

1.2.2.3. A Moral Agent

1.2.2.4. Historicity

1.2.2.5. Uniqueness and  Equality

1.3. What Do We Mean by ‘Human Rights’?

1.3.1. Definition

1.3.2.  Human  Rights Are  Moral Rights

1.3.3. Significant Features Of Human Rights

1.3.3.1. Human Rights Are Basic or Fundamental Rights

1.3.3.2.  Human  Rights Are Universal

1.3.3.3.  Human  Rights Are Indivisible

1.3.3.3.1.  Division  of  Human Rights

1.3.3.3.2.  Indivisibility  of  Human Rights

1.4.  Conclusion 

 

CHAPTER 2. EMERGENCE OF GROUP/COLLECTIVE RIGHTS

 

2.1. What do we mean by Group Rights?

2.1.1. Terms Used

  • Can A Right Borne By A Group Be A Human Right?
  • Conflict between the Rights of the Individuals Who Are Members of the Collectivity and the Collective Rights

2.2. Right-holders of the Emerging Group Rights

2.2.1. Minorities as Subjects of Rights

2.2.1.1. Definition .

2.2.1.2. ‘Minorities’ and  ‘Peoples’

2.2.1.3. ‘Minorities’ and  ‘Indigenous  Peoples’

2.2.1.4. Protection of  Minority Rights

2.2.2. Indigenous Peoples

2.2.2.1. Definition

2.2.2.2. Indigenous Peoples and  ‘Peoples’

2.2.2.3. Indigenous Peoples and  ‘Minorities’

2.2.2.4. Protection of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

2.2.3. The  Future Generations

  • Can the Future Generations Have Rights?
  • Moral Obligations toward Future Generations

2.3.  Emerging  Group Rights 

2.3.1.  The  Right  to Self-Determination

2.3.1.1. The Concept of ‘Self-Determination’

  • Human Rights Instruments and the  Right  to Self-Determination
  • The Right to Self-Determination, a Collective Right
    • The Right to Self-Determination in Relation to Indigenous Peoples and Minorities
  • The Right to Self-Determination and ‘Secession’
  • The Right to Self-Determination, a Human Right

2.3.2. The Right to  Development

  • International Documents and the Right to Development
  • The Meaning and Content of the Right to Development
  • The Right to Development as a Human Right
  • The Right to Development, a Collective Right

2.3.3. The Right to a Safe and Healthy Environment

2.3.3.1. The Concept and Content of the Right to a Safe and Healthy Environment

  • The Term  ‘Environment’
  • The ‘Right’ to a Safe and Healthy Environment
  • Responsibiliy to Ensure a Safe and Healthy Environment

2.3.3.2. The Right to a Safe and Healthy Environment as a Corollary Right

2.3.3.3. The Right to a Safe and Healthy Environment as a Human Right

  • The Right to Environment as a Collective/Group Right
  • A Collective Right of the Present Generation .
  • A Collective Right of the Future Generations and Humanity as a Whole

2.3.3.4.2.1.  Intergenerational Equity

2.3.3.4.2.2. Common Heritage of Mankind

2.4.  Conclusion